Trucking

Retention through a culture of safety — on the path of employment

Jetco delivery CEO Brian Fielkow joined DriverReach Founder and CEO Jeremy Reymer talks about how safety culture plays an important role in recruitment and maintenance strategies in this week’s “Taking the Hire Road” episode, Fielkow’s work as author and speaker, and him. We talked about the new workshop “Making Safety Happen”.

“Safety is essential, but many still think of it from the perspective of a department or safety director, as opposed to a way of life that is rooted in all the decisions we make in the company,” Fielkow said. He added. Its safety is the basis of employee engagement, morale, customer satisfaction, and operational excellence and profitability.

“There is nothing more important than our loved ones going home every day to their families,” Fielkow said.

Under Fielkow’s leadership, Jetco Delivery was named one of the 2021 Best Fleets by the Truckload Carriers Association and Carriers Edge. He is proud of the ongoing discipline of the types of drivers adopted by Houston-based carriers. Even when it’s hard for drivers to come, he said Jetco wouldn’t compromise on his unwavering commitment to safety to grow his fleet.

What sets Jetco apart when it comes to hiring is that some eyes review all candidates before the driver joins.

“Frankly, a person who is a professional driver has a much better eye, can ask much better questions, and can do some kind of pick-up, so a new candidate. I like to make sure that I meet existing drivers. About measures against unspoken words and actions, “said Fierkow.

He further inferred that new employees do not know how to drive Jetco’s way and do not know what their expectations for the driver are. Fielkow states that it will take 6-12 months to integrate new employees into your culture.

He describes Jetco’s progressive level training process as a step-by-step process and how to gradually train drivers to carry increasingly complex loads over time. A great aspect of the program is that many of the experienced heavy duty drivers themselves who have passed the ranks undertake training obligations, further supporting their career safety expectations.

“It’s really fascinating to sell Porsche and deliver Buick during the hiring process, which creates immense frustration among drivers,” Fielkow said. “We never exceed promises or underdelivery. We [don’t want to] Put someone in, but they disappeared after a month. “

Fielkow has written two books on corporate culture. “Aiming for perfection: Achieving business excellence by creating a vibrant culture” and “Leading people safely: How to win on the business battlefield.”

He said the motive behind his writing was the shortcoming he pointed out about other self-help books, which was insufficient to carry out the tactics.

“What I’m trying to do is provide people with practical, hands-on ideas (easy, high-value, low-cost ideas) that allow them to adapt and take the company and safety culture to a whole new level. “To raise it to,” said Fielkow.

In addition to books and seminars, Fielkow recently launched him Achieve safety A training program for organizations to create a world-class safety culture.

He explains that attendees have free access to online training and attend six workshops each month. Each workshop is associated with a module and then concludes with informative conversations between peer groups.

“Safety is the foundation of all the good business of profitable companies doing business in high-impact industries,” says Fielkow. “People consider it safe—think the opposite. Consider the cost of the accident.”

For more information on Fielkow’s Making Safety Happen program, please visit: brianfielkow.com/makingsafetyhappen

Click here for more Freight Waves content by Jack Glenn.

More from taking the employment path:

Stimulating leadership for a bigger future

Leading more women to the truck industry

Driver Ambassador’s Perspective



https://www.freightwaves.com/news/retention-through-a-culture-of-safety-taking-the-hire-road Retention through a culture of safety — on the path of employment

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