Motorcycle

Honda patents hidden camera technology for motorcycles

Honda’s motorcycle camera sensor patent shows that it is easier to hide (in this case with headlights) than radar. (Honda/)

Honda While proud to be a technology leader in motorcycles, the company is currently lagging behind its rivals in the fast-moving areas of external sensors that power in-vehicle safety systems. But that hasn’t been the case for a long time.We have already seen Multiple patents showing that the company is developing front and rear radar systems specifically for the Gold Wing When Africa TwinAnd now, another patent has emerged that reveals a cheaper and simpler safety aid that could be used on a wider range of bikes.

Radar is a proven technology and the system developed by Bosch is already Ducati Panigale V4S, BMW R1250 RT The R 1800 B, Transcontinental, and KTM’s 1290 Adventure S are difficult to integrate into bike styling.All models that use the setup so far — and they are combined by 2022 Kawasaki H2SX— Make very prominent radar units clearly visible.

Related: Development of Honda’s Mind Reading Bike

Honda’s radar patents are already drawing attention to aesthetics, trying to hide the sensor behind the bodywork, but radar isn’t the only object detection option. In the four-wheeled world, some companies, including Subaru, prefer to use stereo cameras rather than radar to measure distance to objects in front of them. Honda’s latest patent shows that it has a similar idea for motorcycles.

The small image sensor is unobtrusively housed next to the LED bulb itself to minimize aesthetic effects.

The small image sensor is unobtrusively housed next to the LED bulb itself to minimize aesthetic effects. (Honda/)

Honda’s patent puts an image sensor inside the bike’s headlights, right next to the LED on the light itself, suggesting that you can use a CCD, MOS, or CMOS sensor (these are all types used in digital cameras). Indicates that it is attached. In this image, the sensor is labeled “17” and “26” and the LED is labeled “15” and “23”. Inside the headlights, an electronic control board is mounted along with the inner wall so that the image sensor is not overwhelmed by the light from the LEDs. This idea seems to have some advantages. This is especially true when packaging sensor technology in a small area of ​​the nose of a motorcycle without compromising its appearance.

The inner wall prevents the LED lights from affecting the sensor, and the onboard processor identifies objects in front.

The inner wall prevents the LED lights from affecting the sensor, and the onboard processor identifies objects in front. (Honda/)

With at least two image sensors that provide a stereo view, you should be able to see how far the objects are. The onboard object recognition processor does the tedious work and can even identify the front. The difference between a pedestrian and a vehicle.

Cameras have some limitations that radar doesn’t have, but they also have advantages, especially if the front view is obstructed by fog or splashes. For example, use camera-based sensors to recognize speed limit signs, identify traffic lights (and the colors displayed on the traffic lights), and identify the brake lights that illuminate the vehicle in front. You can also.

Related: BMW develops radar reflector

In addition, the types of digital camera sensors proposed in Honda’s patents are very cheap and small. Many modern smartphones have three, four, or five cameras, so attaching two such sensors to the headlights of a motorcycle will not add bulk or weight. You can do it.

Due to its small footprint and low cost, the sensor can be mounted on motorcycles of any style and shape.

Due to its small footprint and low cost, the sensor can be mounted on motorcycles of any style and shape. (Honda/)

Ultimately, as already seen in some cars, bikes use a combination of cameras and radar units to provide a wide range of information on systems such as adaptive cruise control, collision avoidance and mitigation, or simply early warning. May provide.

Honda’s patents show different versions of the idea, such as those mounted on a fully faired sport bike and those mounted on a bare roadster, but limit the style of bike that can be used in the system. It is clear that there is no.

https://www.cycleworld.com/story/motorcycle-news/honda-patents-hidden-camera-sensor-technology-for-motorcycles/ Honda patents hidden camera technology for motorcycles

Back to top button